Travel+Fitness: New Travelers Book for Fitness & Health

Travel+Fitness: New Travelers Book for Fitness & Health

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA — With more Americans traveling on business and pleasure than ever before, the need for improved fitness and well-being on the road has never been greater. A common resolve among road warriors: find creative ways to exercise, eat right and reduce stress on upcoming trips.

Coming soon to this website will be exercise and travel tips based on the popular book Travel Fitness & Feel Better, Perform Better on the Road. Rebecca Johnson and Bill Tulin, authors of Travel Fitness, which Jim Yenckel, the Washington Post’s travel writer, referred to as “…the best book on the subject,” are on a mission to help wiped-out, eat-on-the-run travelers meet their fitness goals. “Travelers can easily incorporate their regular fitness programs or begin a new program when away from home,” says Johnson. “There are creative ways to be healthy and fit while on the road, with the added benefits of reduced stress and increased productivity.”

According to Tulin, the need for better fitness while traveling has never been greater. Nearly one-half of travelers polled by USA Today felt that they were in worse shape because they lack the time or the means to exercise properly during travel.

For those who can’t wait for these additions to the travelfitness.com website, a copy of Travel Fitness can now be ordered through Amazon.com’s online bookstore.

Exercise & Nutrition to help Frequent Travelers avoid Stress, Fatigue.

As part of their efforts to promote good health on the road, Johnson and Tulin speak to groups of traveling executives, write extensively on the topic of fitness and travel and provide one-on-one consultations to travelers. With a little creativity, every road warrior can win the travel battle, say Johnson and Tulin. Some of Johnson and Tulin’s travel tips include the following:

  • Book a daytime arrival, especially if you are on a west-to-east flight. Once you are there, drag yourself outside and do something active in the daylight. You can recover from jet lag much more quickly.
  • Cabin air is drier than the Sahara. Before you hop the plane, fill your own water bottle. To combat dehydration (and the fatigue it causes), drink two 8-ounce glasses before boarding, then another one each hour in flight.
  • To preserve your hard-earned fitness level, exercise at least every third day while on the road, performing at least a third of your aerobic routine at your typical level of intensity and completing your strength training program at least once a week, using the same amount of resistance. Keeping at least part of your routine in tact will keep your energy level up.
  • Walk the length of the plane every hour or two to keep your back happy, your muscles supple, and your blood circulating.
  • If you’re not traveling first or business class, book an emergency exit row aisle seat to enjoy a roomier seat with extra leg room.
  • Hide the hotel clock. Knowing that it’s 3 a.m. and you have to get up at 6 a.m. guarantees that you won’t sleep for the remaining three hours.
  • When eating out on the road, try ordering without looking at the menu. Arrive at the restaurant with a healthy meal in mind, like steamed vegetables or broiled chicken, and just order it.
  • Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedintumblr